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When the “LKA Emerald” was unearthed in 1984 in the Hiddenite area of North Carolina, it was considered the largest intact emerald found in North America at 1,686.3 carats, it currently ranks as the 2nd largest and continues to this date as the only unearthed Hiddenite Emerald in one piece. The name “LKA” comes from the company that owned the mine at the time. The “Stephenson Emerald found in the same region in 1969, weighs 1,438 carats. It also was considered the largest North American Emerald until the discovery of the LKA Emerald, 

This stone was named after John A. D. Stephenson, a 19th century

​ of Hiddenite area gems.

Both of these gems were displayed

​​​​​ in the American Museum of Natural ​History 

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     And View The Worlds Largest Emeralds

   And the LKA & Stephenson Emeralds

                         @ I.G.S Website

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Doves of Peace


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       LKA EMERALD

              Earths Emerald Crystals - Treasures from the Earth

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         FOR SALE A RARE EMERALD COLLECTION 

       A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO PURCHASE

        THE LKA EMERALD 1,686.3 CARATS 

     THE STEPHENSON EMERALD 1,438 CARATS

         â€‹Both Very Rare Emeralds are a unique glimpse into Americana  and Native     American  folklore of rare "Green Bolts" and are storied in Native American history.
               
 â€‹â€‹â€‹â€‹â€‹Important American History for Collectors and Museums.

                                             


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 Author of this Article by Mark Ivan Jacobson (copyright not for reproduction)

President of



 The LKA and Finger (Stephenson) emeralds appears on the market
 In June of 1990, LKA International had the 1984 discovered LKA Emerald and the 1969 Michael Finger (Stephenson)   Emerald evaluated for quality and value by J. Gelster, who was a member of the American Gem Market System,   Moraga, CA (1981-1991 as registered in California). At the time of its discovery, the 1,686.3 carat LKA Emerald was   the largest North American Emerald. The Finger emerald had been obtained by LKA with their 1982 purchase of the   former Charles Rist assets – land, buildings and museum collection. 
 Circa 1992, Kye Abraham, owner and CEO of LKA International, appears to have sold both emeralds to Rick G.   Cogburn  of Charleston, SC. After their purchase, the two emeralds were evaluated/appraised by Mary Croghan   Ramsey of Croghan’s Jewel Box, Charleston, SC in November 1992. From 1992 until 2008 no information has       surfaced  regarding these two emeralds; there is also no evidence they had ever been displayed publicly since 1982.
 In June 2008, the two emeralds were examined by C. “Cap” R. Beesley, president of the American Gemological   Laboratories, New York City. This authorative laboratory confirmed that these two crystals were indeed, the un-   modified original crystals that had been in storage since the 1980s
 With this higher level of confidence, in 2009 the two emerald crystals were sold, via a complicated arrangement, to   the “Emerald Owners Holding Company,” who moved the emeralds to another secure bank vault, where they still are   in 2017.  Other: Photos may be  used on this website  by  Mark Jacobson  with permission of emeraldsrare.com

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  • 13600761.mp30:24

LKA   EMERALD

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 Natural emeralds form in either pegmatite deposits or hydrothermal veins in metamorphic environments. In   a hydrothermal vein, hydrothermal fluids have escaped from magma deeper in the Earth's crust. When these   fluids contain the specific elements that are in emeralds (like beryllium) and begin to cool in deposit veins,   emeralds start to form, In pegmatite deposits magma, instead of hydrothermal fluids is the key component in   emeralds formation. When the magma cools elements remain in the solution of the fluid left over, when the   right elements remain, and optimal conditions such as cooling are in place, emeralds form.
 The Rarest Gems are reported to be Emeralds and  more than forty times as rare as diamonds and with few   exeptions are mined with the same archaic methods used for hundreds of years. The Carolina emerald   weighing thirteen point four carats  was not discoverd in Columbia or Brazil as one might expect but an   emerald deposit in North Carolina. In addition to the Carolina emerald, this deposit is the source of many   impressive finds including the Marie emerald and the June Culp Zeitener emerald. Experts, after examming   these emeralds, agree they rival the finest stones from Columbia including the very rare large  Stephenson   and the LKA  emeralds also unearthed in the Hiddenite area of North Carolina and containing the variety of   Spodumene of which  is unique because it is found only in a small geographic region of North Carolina and   also because it receives its intense color from Chromium, the same element that gives emerald its deep green   hue.
 For centuries Colombia has been one of the most prolific producers of emeralds in the world. Very few   locations from any geographic area produce emeralds in the same quality, quantity and visual appeal as this   lush, tropical, South American country. This isolated and exotic mining area, an extension of the Andes in   central Colombia is rich in both history and international intrigue, for example, the original deposits of El   Chivor date back to the early 1500's and were reportedly mined by the Chibcha Indians of the high Colombian   plateau, this was a part of the world where highly developed native indian tribes collided with the invading   Spanish Conquistadors, the ensuing battles for local treasure ravaged both the conscience and cultures of   Europe and South America. The Spanish invasion of this territory introduced the outside world to a fantastic   treasure trove of high quality emeralds and gold to adorn the monarchs and potentates of Europe and the   world. In addition to Colombia, there are several other historically and commercially important sites around   the world that produce emeralds. Most importantly, these locations include Russia, Africa, Brazil, and   Afghanistan. However, within the spectrum of emerald producing areas, one of the rare deposits in the world   is tucked away in the isolated mountains of western North Carolina. This area has enjoyed a rich history of   producing some of the most significant emeralds in North America and allthough this location has not been a   prolific producer it has in fact produced some exceptionally large crystals of historical significance. Part of   the  special appeal of important gems and minerals is frequently the provenance size and quality associated   with the material and In this case the special history of this location and uniqueness of these crystals is in   part  intimately entwined with a dynamic period of American natural history.  According to historical records   and reports, the Hiddenite area of North Carolina began producing material in the decomposed rock from the   surrounding farms in 1875.  The primary investigator and naturalist was John Adlai D. Stephenson who was   credited with the discovery and subsequently implemented a systematic plan of accumulating these green   bolts from local residents in the Hiddenite area. Similarly the mineralogist William Earl Hidden on   assignment to locate platinum deposits on behalf of Thomas Edison's light bulb development project,   connected with Stephenson in 1879.  In 1880, Hidden continued his interest in the emeralds and related   minerals of this area by forming the Emerald and Hiddenite Mining Company. 
 An emerald specimen reportedly weighing 1,270 carats and dating from this time period became part of the   collection of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and a second crystal weighing 1,276   carats resides in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.  The  Ownership by these   pre-eminent institutions underscores the importance of emeralds from this location and In this case the   emerald crystals described in reports  share an equally important place in the mineralogical history of North   Carolina Emeralds and American gemstones.  
 According to historical records the 1,686.3 carat elongated  LKA Emerald crystal represents the second   largest  emerald crystal discovered in North America and this excellent crystal specimen reportedly   discovered in 1984 has been designated the  LK A  Emerald after the mining company that operated the     property until 1985. The second crystal weighing 1,438 carats designated the Finger Emerald  was discovered   in 1969 by Michael "Butch" Finger and for some time was the largest known North American emerald crystal,   the  LKA  Mining Company later renamed this crystal "The Stephenson Eemerald", after the original   researcher credited with the discovery of the location. Although quantity and production of emeralds has   never been a hallmark of the Hiddenite area, its importance to American mineralogical history is vital and   unchalleng
ed
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​These two crystals the LKA and Stephenson Emeralds represent a rare and unusual glimpse   into Americana and Native American  folklore of rare "Green Bolts" and are storied in Native American   history and are a valuable addition to any collection of important American minerals.
                                 


   American Gemological Laboratories Reports


  • 10028357.mp38:55

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Societies & Donate Today


OTHER HISTORY OF THESE EMERALDS  SINCE UNEARTHED BELOW


        SEASON GREETINGS TO ALL AND OUR BEST WISHES FOR 2018

 FROM  EMERALDSRARE


Emerald has been a source of fascination and reverence in many cultures

  • 10118598.mp32:38

           Visit Earth Magazine

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           AGMS 1990 VALUES BELOW USD

INFLATION CACULATOR IN 2018 FIGURES APPROX $6,0OO A CARAT WEIGHT

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-Friends of Mineralogy FM
9056558569
​​3213124171
-Mindat
833-306-7797
-Mineralogical Society of America
/www.minsocam.org/
-List of U.S. state minerals, rocks, stones and gemstones
202-750-5750
-Mineralogy Database
/www.webmineral.com/
-Mineralogical Association of Canada
Association minéralogique du Canada  
 
/www.mineralogicalassociation.ca/index.php?p=1
-Barite Specimen Localities
(920) 459-2143

-American Federation of
Mineralogical Societies

/www.amfed.org/
-Mineralogical Record
 prefraternal
-Mineral Monographs
 /www.lithographie.org/


​-Mineral News
 /www.mineralnews.com/
-National Research Council Canada
909-499-0158
-The Mineralogical Society, sponsor of Mineralogical Magazine
(515) 300-6466
-European Journal of Mineralogy
 /www.schweizerbart.de/j/ejm/index.htm
-Pegmatite Interest Group (PIG), hosted by the MSA 
 971-291-9976
-Robert B. Ferguson Museum, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada /www.umanitoba.ca/geoscience/MuseumWeb/MuseumWeb/index.html
​-Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals in Oregon
/ricenorthwestmuseum.org/
-Tellus: Northwest Georgia Science Museum,  Minearal Gallery
 /www.tellusmuseum.org/
-Barite Specimen Localities
 /www.baritespecimenlocalities.org/
​- North carolina musium of natural sciences
(910) 457-0646
-New york musium of natural sciences
908-946-5516
-The Society of Mineral Museum Professionals

​​/www.smmp.net/organization.htm
​-Minerant Global Museums-Collecting-Mineral Dealers

​​​/www.minerant.org/home.html

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  • 39247376.mp31:33

    SEE MORE EMERALD PHOTOS & DATA

Replay 

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           More History and data in Voice Below >

​ HOW EMERALDS

ARE FOUND 

                      







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-Smithsonian Museum 
/mineralsciences.si.edu/

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​​​​​​​​​​​​Disclaimer and Confidentiality: All data and valuations provided and voice articles on this website and data  are subject to purchaser, viewers, investors, independent analysis, inspections and appraisals at purchasers sole cost, all data is provided on a confidential basis to recipient and not for reproduction to any third party without written approval . Sale is subject to removal from marketplace without prior notice prior to a definitive contract commitment. Ref to the Sale and Purchase of the LKA and Stephenson Emeralds etc.Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, emeraldsrare.com and its product owners takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.
Links Disclamer: Web Site Emeraldsrare.com and its product  owners disclaims all liability for the quality, content, nature, or reliability of sites accessible by hyperlink from the Site, or sites linking to the Site. The linked sites are not under the control of Emeraldsrare.com and its product  owners and emeraldsrare.com and its product owners shall not be responsible for the content of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any review, changes, or updates to such sites. The inclusion of any link does not imply any affiliation, endorsement or adoption by emeraldsrare.com and its product owners of a linked site or any information contained therein. When leaving the Site for another site, you should be aware that these Terms of Use no longer govern, and therefore you should review the applicable terms and policies, including privacy and data-gathering practices, of that other site. emeraldsrare.com and its product owners disclaims all liability for content of websites linking to or framing the Site.


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FOR THE COLLECTION OF THESE LKA &  STEPHENSON  RARE EMERALDS

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  ​​If required by Purchaser at sale we can introduce the purchaser  

  to a large USA National Musium  that these unique  Emeralds  would be an important unique addition to  their Collection â€‹ however they would require the owner to donate  this collection to them      


 

                                 








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1888 Photo Hiddenite Area Mining

Early Emerald Mining

Near Hiddenite, Alexander County, North Carolina USA

  Friends of Mineralogy FM      8507094939/index.html


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IN AUDIO SEE ALL HISTORY AND DATA IN GREEN BOXES BELOW >


 






VIDEO BELOW OF THEASE  EMERALDS WILL LOAD IN A FEW SECONDS

MORE HISTORY


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EMERALDS WORTH MORE THAN DIAMONDS

 









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  • 35310351.mp32:36



PHOTO THE EMERALD SEAS TCI ISLANDS

            LKA & STEPHENSON 1992 APPRAISALS BELOW

INFLATION CACULATOR IN 2018 FIGURES APPROX $17,000,00 M USD


​​​ ​​        Mega News Channel  Worlds Largest Emeralds Video link below

VIDEOS

-Crystal Bridges Exhibitions

Introduction



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​​ SPODUMENE MINERAL

IN HIDDENITE  EMERALDS


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  STEPHENSON           EMERALD